Top Ohenro Information Site

If you are coming to Shikoku to walk the 88 Temple Pilgrimage route there is one website that stands way above the rest. It is this one:

http://www.shikokuhenrotrail.com/index.html

David Turkington is the mastermind behind the site and he is tremendously well-read, articulate, helpful, non-preachy, and a regular good guy. I even corresponded with him recently and asked for some help in advising ohenro coming this way and he said, “Sure thing. No problem”. That is very good news.

So while you likely have a ton of questions about the pilgrimage, what to wear, which way to go, what to look out for, how to get from place A to place B, do yourself a HUGE favour, bookmark his site, and read everything there. It’s pilgrim gold.

And here is Dave’s blog and contact information:

http://www.shikokuhenrotrail.com/shikoku/contactInfo.html

http://essentiallynothing.blogspot.com

Ohenro Article in Sri Lanka

Most certainly word of people’s experiences on the Shikoku 88 Temple Pilgrimage is getting out more and more. One of the participant on the Ohenro San お遍路さん Facebook  group shared this link. I want to share it with you here too.

http://www.sundaytimes.lk/190818/plus/soaking-in-the-pilgrim-sites-of-shikoku-2-363092.html?fbclid=IwAR3OwQmuDbJV58DkX5LMHqrb8I0y55K0_Ou8VtS7unRunVwr_6GAN9mOG70

I will keep posting more articles as I find them. If you see something on-line that you think should be here for others to discover, please drop me a line and let me know!

Thanks so much and travel safe!

Matsushita Naoyuki: Visiting the Sacred Sites of Kukai

Deciding to come to Shikoku to walk the path of Kukai, and visit the 88 temples on the trail is a serious undertaking. One does not simply walk around Shikoku. One must be prepared. One must read well. One must most certainly get this book. Don’t worry, on Kindle it is super cheap. It’ll cost you less than a single bento lunch. And it will be super worth-it.

Matsushita Naoyuki (with kind assistance of David Moreton) bring this MUST-READ book to light. It is called “Visiting the Sacred Sites of Kukai”. Understated in the title, but invaluable in content, you really must read this book through and through, take the notes you need to, and prepare what you need for the trek of your life. I cannot recommend this book more. Go to Amazon and order henceforth:

While the style of the book is not super engaging there is a ton of very helpful hints and advice, as well as highly useful information with details on all the things that will make your pilgrimage effective, worthwhile, and enriching. Don’t let that stop you for a moment. Remember that the author’s native tongue is not English, and just be grateful that this book is out there to help you get ready for an event that may change you forever. When visiting a temple on the route, say a quiet word of thanks, and drop a coin in the temple box, as you make your way around Shikoku. Remember everything here that Matsushita-san is teaching you.

And of course, travel safe!

Website To Check Out!

The summer is pretty hot here in sunny Kagawa. I’m hiding out inside the house for a few hours during mid-day to stay out of the sun. I suppose I could complain about it, but then again, what’s the point? It’s hot. It’s Japan. It’s Kagawa, and I still get to live in one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen.

But looking forward to the next season of Shikoku Pilgrimage ohenro (pilgrims) it’s time to start recommending sources of information so that when you come out this way you have all the tools and information you need to make your experience on Kukai’s trail unbelievable, well-organized, and fulfilling.

The first website I want to recommend you take a look at is:

http://wwwtb.mlit.go.jp/shikoku/88navi/en/

This website is a storehouse of great information for getting around. It shows exactly what train lines get to Shikoku, what gets you around Shikoku, supplies sample itineraries, and has great visuals to show you how far to walk from transportation hubs to the temples. Check it out, take careful notes, and plan accordingly. Lots of great photos throughout too!

The Heart Sutra

I had been putting this blog off for quite some time. Attempting to write about The Heart Sutra, presenting it on this blog, seems like such a disservice to the spiritual, aesthetic, and cultural significance of this artifact. I feel completely inadequate trying to put it out here for readers and to attempt to explain or represent.

But here we are anyway.

I want to apologize for any errors in misrepresentation that occur from here on out. I very much would like to see more visitors to Shikoku, and to our home prefecture, Kagawa. There are some amazing and surprising things to see and hear when you explore these surroundings.

First time visitors to Shikoku, particularly those who venture out to visit any of the 88 temples on the Shikoku pilgrimage will inevitably see the Ohenro dressed in white, hear the sound of walking sticks tapping stone, the jangling of bells. And then they will hear the chanting of … something. Something deep and beautiful and reverent.

What you are likely hearing is the Heart Sutra:

Kan ji zai bo satsu. Gyo jin han nya hara mita ji. Sho ken.  Go on kai ku. Do issai ku yaku. Sha ri shi. Shiki fu i ku. Ku fu i shiki. Shiki soku ze ku. Ku soku ze shiki. Ju so gyo shiki. Yaku bu nyo ze. Shari shi. Ze sho ho ku so. Fu sho fu metsu. Fu ku fu jo. Fu zo fu gen. Ze ko ku chu. Mu shiki mu ju so gyo shiki. Mu gen ni bi ze shin i. Mu shiki sho ko mi soku ho. Mu gen kai nai shi mu i shiki kai. Mu mu myo yaku mu mu myo jin. Nai shi mu ro shi. Yaku mu ro shi jin. Mu ku shu metsu do. Mu chi yaku mu toku. I mu sho toku ko. Bodai sat ta e hannya haramita. Ko shin mu ke ge mu ke ge ko. Mu u ku fu. On ri issai ten do mu so. Ku gyo ne han. San ze sho butsu. E hannya haramita. Ko toku a noku ta ra san myaku san bodai. Ko chi hannya haramita.  Ze dai jin shu. Ze dai myo shu. Ze mu jo shu. Ze mu to do shu. No jo issai ku. Shin jitsu fu ko ko setsu hannya haramita shu. Soku setsu shu watsu. Gya tei, gya tei, ha ra gya tei. Hara so gya tei.  Bo ji so waka. Hannya Shingyo.

Here is a very  nice modern performed version of the Heart Sutra. The priest in this video is Yakushiji Kanji who is an active priest in Ehime prefecture. You may very well meet him on your pilgrimage here.

Below is the translation of the Japanese. It does not flow so gently, but you can gather the meaning of the sutra itself.

Avalokiteshvara, the Bodhisattva of Compassion, was deep through the Perfection of Wisdom, saw clearly that the five aggregates of human existence are empty, and so released himself from suffering.

“Sariputra! Form is nothing more than emptiness, emptiness is nothing more than Form. Form is exactly emptiness, and emptiness is exactly Form. The other four aggregates of human existence — feeling, thought, will, and consciousness — are also nothing more than emptiness.”

“Sariputra! All things are empty: Nothing is born, nothing dies, nothing is pure, nothing is stained, nothing increases and nothing decreases. So, in emptiness, there is no form, no feeling, no thought, no will, no consciousness. There are no eyes, no ears, no nose, no tongue, no body, no mind. There is no seeing, no hearing, no smelling, no tasting, no touching, no imagining. No plane of sight, no plane of thought. There is no ignorance, and no end to ignorance. There is no old age and death, and no end to old age and death. There is no suffering, no cause of suffering, no end to suffering, no path to suffering. There is no attainment of wisdom, and no wisdom to attain.”

The Bodhisattvas rely on the Perfection of Wisdom, their hearts without delusions; they have no reason for delusion, no fear within, abandoning their confused thoughts, finally experiencing Nirvana.

The Buddhas, past, present, and future, rely on the Perfection of Wisdom, and live in full enlightenment. The Perfection of Wisdom is the greatest mantra. It is the wisest mantra, the highest mantra, the mantra of the rest. Remove all suffering. This is truth that cannot be falsity. The reason of the Perfection of Wisdom Mantra, The Mantra is thus: Gaté, gaté, paragaté, parasamgaté. Bodhi! Svaha!

I want to leave this blog at that. The Heart Sutra and all its metaphysical implications is heavy material. You may want to think on this for yourself and see how it applies to who you are, where you are, what you want to do, and how you want to live. No lectures or “insights” from me.

Travel well. Travel safe.

All the best.

TV Asahi reports on foreign pilgrims in Japan

This report is a couple of years old, but still very relevant. There are more and more people from overseas who are discovering the Shikoku Pilgrimage. There is so much that is attractive and unique about the experience. Check out this video to see a little of what it is like to walk the path of Kukai:

Did you notice the incredible calm that these foreign visitors have? The safe environment, the kindness and humanity of people around them, and the time and space to explore and enjoy the day walking from temple to temple is simply beyond riches. Wonderful. Thanks to TV Asahi for putting this together!!