Temple 78: Goshouji

This is one of the temples on the pilgrimage which is truly inspiring to visit. A bit of a hike up the hill you will come to a very nicely spread out temple with much to see.

There is a legend that when the bell was being created in the fire, an unknown man put something into the cast. As a result, the bell is said to ring out longer and louder than any others.

As you wander around  the temple grounds you will see a tunnel that goes underground. This is a pathway to a Shinto shrine that has thousands of statues of Amida.

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As we approach the main gate.

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Still walking.
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Just a little further..
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Here is the story of the bell.
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This pilgrim is going to try it out. You can too.
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Almost looks like it comes out of a painting. Beautiful temple. Japanese pine to the side.

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Within are the statues of the three monkeys: see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.

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A few more stairs.

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Will you take a look?
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This is what you may see.

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The three monkeys of “See no Evil, Hear no Evil, Speak no Evil” are kind of cartoonish characters in Western culture. We tend not to take that so seriously. Maybe that is okay, but there is something for us to consider in all of that as well.

Our refusal to participate in things that are not good for us is a statement of character. It is easy to listen to gossip and rumor, and then to repeat that to others. It is easy for us to see terrible things and some people get pleasure from that. It may not be necessary to dunk yourself in some esoteric existence and wander like the monks of old from temple to temple in deep contemplation, cutting yourself off from the world, but maybe there is something good for us to choose to “stay out of the trash” and focus on the things that improve our minds and bodies, and make us of value and service to others. That was my thought for the day.

The spiritual journey does not consist of arriving at a new destination where a person gains what he did not have, or becomes what he is not. It consists in the dissipation of one’s own ignorance concerning one’s self and life, and gradual growth of that understanding, which begins a spiritual awakening. The finding of God is coming to one’s self. 
Aldous Huxley