Temple 65: Sankakuji

This temple is called “Triangle Temple”. The triangle has been used as a holy symbol in many faith systems, including mythologies in Christian religions as well. This temple has its name from the a triangular altar, as well as a triangular mini lake on the premises as well.

Kukai is said to have banished a ghost that lived here using the triangular altar.

This is also a temple said to protect women in childbirth.

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There are stairs. Prepare to climb!
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They are a bit uneven, so please proceed judiciously.
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The temple bell is right in the gate.
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Don’t be too shy. Go ahead and ring it out.

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The very first blossoms of spring.
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Rustic, natural, blending in…

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There is a giant of a tree bending over this path.

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The triangular pond.

Kobou Daishi (Kukai) is said to have come to this remove the bad luck that comes to men at the age of 42. Japanese men have bad luck years when they are 25, 42, or 60. Women face bad luck on years when they are 19, 33, or 37. It is custom in Japan to visit the shrine and have the issue of your bad luck addressed by a monk or priest. The bad luck year is called “yakudoshi”.

Whether or not you believe in good luck or bad luck, when you live long enough you see both fortune and misfortune happen to others, and maybe to yourself too. The pilgrimage route is a tremendous solace to many people who walk it. Some travel the miles to figure out something in their head. Others travel it to help the pain of loss settle a little more in their hearts. Maybe if they can endure the trials of the road, they can carry the pain in their heart back in their regular day-to-day.

Whatever your reason is to walk these miles, you should know that there are lots who have gone before, lots who are along the path, and many more to come after you. You are part of  a link to others in a chain, and to others around you too, forming some kind of chainmail. There may be some comfort in that, realized initially or realized later, it is still there and a marvel in the making.

“Everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you’re climbing it.” 
-Andy Rooney