Temple 67: Daikouji

Located out in the countryside, and looking out over many farmer’s fields, Daikouji is a beautiful temple that has at its base a giant camphor tree that was planted by Koubou Daishi. It is a marvel, and the temple up the stairs is spectacular as well.

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Kukai
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The front gate.

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Walking onto the compound.
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Wow.
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Trees are special and holy on temple grounds and in shrines as well. Many visitors touch the trees as they walk by. You should too.

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Lovely pine trees all around.
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Visitors picked up pine needles for good luck.
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This temple is also called “Komatsu-ji” or “Small Pine Temple”
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So perfectly kept.

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One thing that always charms me is when so many pilgrims come to the temples, struggle up the slopes and stairs and still manage to say, “Good morning” or “Good afternoon” to people coming the other way. If the path to the top is long, many people are encouraging to those going up, and you are often met with smiling faces.

Reading through the travel logs, blogs, and vlogs of other expatriate ohenro, I hear and see the same thing again and again. People on the pilgrimage route, whether they come by bus, foot, or motorcycle, are really nice. It is a great thing to say something to someone on the path, or in your neighborhood, or at the supermarket. Something about the ohenro experience that reminds us to be humane and kind to one another. And that is not a bad thing at all.

“It was only a sunny smile, and little it cost in the giving, but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” 
-F. Scott Fitzgerald